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December 2019 Newsletter

Our last newsletter of the year brings information on improving posture. Mike and Jeff demonstrates simple exercises that will help improve posture. Jeff's article on doing warm ups prior to exercising details the areas that should be warmed up and tells how to do this. See the last page for some exciting new training programs that will be available in 2020. Download Here

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Changing Priorities

Changing Priorities There are five components to any well-designed fitness program.  Cardiorespiratory capacity, strength training, injury prevention, mobility enhancement, and muscle endurance. Most fitness participants prioritize the five components in this manner: Cardiorespiratory Capacity Muscle Endurance Mobility Enhancement Strength Training Injury Prevention A typical training session consists of 30 minutes of cardio, multiple sets of high repetition muscle isolation exercises finished off with a series of stretches.  The top three components are involved in every workout.  Strength training and injury prevention are generally ignored.  This is the reason most people fail to achieve fitness results and often end up injured. Most fitness participants would be better served if they completely reversed that prioritization: Injury Prevention Strength Training Mobility Enhancement Muscle…

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Half Kneeling Leverbell Chop

Half Kneeling Leverbell Chop The hip joints and lumbar spine work as teammates to create pain free and efficient movement.  When we run, jump, swing, and throw, the hip must move and the lumbar spine stays stable.  Most of us need more hip mobility and greater lumbar spine stability.  An activity that delivers both of these traits is the half kneeling leverbell chop. Leverbell is the new, and better name, for a mace.  It is a metal bar with a heavy ball on one end.  The offset load of the leverbell produces a dynamic resistance that makes it an effective tool for stabilization training.  Read this article and watch the video. Set up in a genuflexion position with the right…

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Pressurize Your Anatomical Inner Tube

Pressurize Your Anatomical Inner Tube Push Up Position Planks The center of the body is a cylindrical tube of interwoven muscle and fascia.  On the top and bottom, you have the diaphragm and pelvic floor.  The sides are reinforced by the oblique muscles and across the front by the rectus and tranverse abdominus muscles.  These muscles work together to create pressure inside the cylinder.  The tension capacity of our “anatomical inner tube” allows us to lift, carry, push, and pull loads that would overwhelm any single joint in the spine.  Developing better tension strength will improve athleticism and reduce injuries.  One of the best exercises to improve tension strength is the Push Up Position Plank. Push Up Position Planks –…

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Mantis Maker

Mantis Maker When we crawl, walk, and run, our limbs work in a reciprocal pattern to propel us through space. The muscles in the middle of the body conduct force from the hip to the opposite side shoulder. Unfortunately, age, injury, and sedentary lifestyle can hamper control of reciprocal limb movement. If you lose this primal movement pattern, then posture, movement efficiency and respiration become impaired. Performing the mobility stick dead bug on a regular basis will restore reciprocal movement, normalize posture, and resolve pain. Mobility Stick Dead Bug Lie supine on the floor. Lift the legs up to 90 plus degrees hip flexion with the knees bent to 90 plus degrees. Place a short mobility stick between the right…

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Be A Betta Pilla!

Be A Betta Pilla! The limiting performance parameter during an overhead press is often core stability strength. If you lack the capacity to keep a solid pillar under the load being lifted, your brain will shut down the exercise. A simple drill that will improve core stability during an overhead press is the half kneeling mobility stick overhead press. Half Kneeling Mobility Stick Overhead Press Place the right knee down on an Airex pad. Plant the left foot in front of the left hip with the tibia--lower leg bone--perpendicular to the ground. Tighten the left gluteals and keep the left foot pushed firmly into the ground. The toes of your right foot should be solidly positioned on the floor. Hold…

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