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Better and Not Broken

Better and Not Broken 2020 Resolution January has arrived, and with the new year comes a sudden surge in fitness participation.  January’s well-intentioned training efforts produce many of the physical therapy patients we treat in February and March.  Fitness folks that morph into physical therapy patients travel remarkably similar paths.   For those returning to exercise, I have some suggestions that will keep you in the gym and out of the clinic. Choose Joint Friendly Exercises Many of the training tools in the typical fitness facility limit movement to one joint.  Seated knee extension, prone leg curls, seated shoulder abduction, and seated hip abduction wedge the body into artificial alignments in an effort to place load on one muscle.  Older, overloaded,…

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December 2019 Newsletter

Our last newsletter of the year brings information on improving posture. Mike and Jeff demonstrates simple exercises that will help improve posture. Jeff's article on doing warm ups prior to exercising details the areas that should be warmed up and tells how to do this. See the last page for some exciting new training programs that will be available in 2020. Download Here

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Cancer and Exercise

Cancer and Exercise In the 1950’s, doctors told heart attack patients to stay in bed for three weeks.  The standard post surgery advice was long periods of rest and activity avoidance.  My mother recalls her doctor telling her to rest in bed for five days after the birth of each of her five children.  She knew his advice was wrong and completely impossible for a mother of five.  During my physical therapy work in the 1980’s and 1990’s, it was very common for patients with back and neck pain to be instructed by their doctor to stay in bed for a week.  All of this medical instruction has been proven to be more harmful than helpful.  The best course of…

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November 2019 Newsletter

Just what exactly is your "core"? Mike O'Hara answers that question and describes the function of the core muscles.  Jeff Tirrell answers the question--"But don't I need cardio?" Download Here

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A Powerful Pair of Rip Trainer Drills

A Powerful Pair of Rip Trainer Drills Ten Minutes to Better Core Strength, Balance, and Posture A rip trainer is a four foot long bar with resistance tubing attached to one end.  The tubing can be anchored at different levels, and the rip trainer used to provide three-dimensional resistance for many different movement patterns.  Over the years, I have found the pairing of two rip trainer drills produces excellent results with nearly all fitness clients.  Many clients find the carry over to real life activity is so pronounced that they have purchased rip trainers for home use.  Read the remainder of this article and watch a video demonstration of each of the drills. If you are new to the rip…

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The Change Challenge

The Change Challenge For the Next Twelve Training Sessions Go into any gym and you will see people working their biceps and pectoral muscles one day, deltoids and triceps the next day, and occasionally some form of leg press or knee extension for a leg day.  This “muscle isolation” training comes from the drug enhanced world of bodybuilding.  For the average fitness client and any athlete, isolating muscles is of little value.  The muscles are slaves to the orders sent from the brain.  Your brain recognizes movement patterns--crawl, hip hinge, squat--not individual muscles.  The drivers of performance and fitness are the neural and hormonal changes produced by exercise.  Isolation exercises dampen that neural response.  For many fitness clients, isolation exercise…

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