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July 2019 Newsletter

This month, Mike O'Hara discusses the most important training patterns to perform in order to stay independent as you age. Video demonstration can be seen using the link at the end of the article.  Mike also writes about training your legs to prevent injury in his article, Give Your Legs Some Love. Meet some Fenton Fitness members--Nicole and Carl Pearson. Download Here

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Robo Squat

Robo Squat Much like the collision avoidance computer systems built into automobiles, our brains run neural software that prevents us from overloading and damaging the spine.  Our neural software inhibits us from loading the extremities in positions that have the potential to produce a spinal injury.  Many people have the mobility necessary to perform a full depth squat, what they lack is spinal stability.  Improve spinal stability and the protective neural software will permit more graceful and efficient movement.  An exercise that will enhance spinal stability during an essential movement pattern is the leverbell squat. Leverbell Squat Hold a leverbell with a vertical alignment and the heavy end upward.  Use a stacked grip, push the chest up, and pull the…

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Split Squat 101 (Part 4–Front and Rear Foot Elevated)

Split Squat 101 Part 4--Front and Rear Foot Elevated At Fenton Fitness, we love the Split Squat.  This exercise can be modified for beginners or injured clients, and can be progressed to be one of the most challenging lower body movements you will ever do.  We love the Split Squat because it challenges balance, works all the major muscles of the legs, and depending on the variation, it can be a great core exercise as well.  We don’t have to use nearly as much weight as a standard bilateral squat which is great for people with lower back or neck issues that don’t tolerate high levels of compressive forces very well.  We can progress/regress the Split Squat by adding load,…

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Split Squat 101 (Part 3–Rear Foot Elevated)

Split Squat 101 Part 3--Rear Foot Elevated At Fenton Fitness, we love the Split Squat.  This exercise can be modified for beginners or injured clients, and can be progressed to be one of the most challenging lower body movements you will ever do.  We love the Split Squat because it challenges balance, works all the major muscles of the legs, and depending on the variation, it can be a great core exercise as well.  We don’t have to use nearly as much weight as a standard bilateral squat which is great for people with lower back or neck issues that don’t tolerate high levels of compressive forces very well.  We can progress/regress the Split Squat by adding load, changing the…

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Split Squat 101 (Part 2–Kettlebell and Dumbbell Loaded)

Split Squat 101 Part 2--Kettlebell and Dumbbell Loaded At Fenton Fitness, we love the Split Squat.  This exercise can be modified for beginners or injured clients, and can be progressed to be one of the most challenging lower body movements you will ever do.  We love the Split Squat because it challenges balance, works all the major muscles of the legs, and depending on the variation, it can be a great core exercise as well.  We don’t have to use nearly as much weight as a standard bilateral squat which is great for people with lower back or neck issues that don’t tolerate high levels of compressive forces very well.  We can progress/regress the Split Squat by adding load, changing…

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Split Squat 101 (Part 1–Set Up and Assisted)

Split Squat 101 Part 1--Set Up and Assisted At Fenton Fitness, we love the Split Squat.  This exercise can be modified for beginners or injured clients, and can be progressed to be one of the most challenging lower body movements you will ever do.  We love the Split Squat because it challenges balance, works all the major muscles of the legs, and depending on the variation, it can be a great core exercise as well.  We don’t have to use nearly as much weight as a standard bilateral squat which is great for people with lower back or neck issues that don’t tolerate high levels of compressive forces very well.  We can progress/regress the Split Squat by adding load, changing…

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